Wednesday, January 4, 2017

THOUGHTS ON THE PROCESS

One of the things that I am becoming more and more convinced of as I study for my personal trainer’s certification is the psychological link in becoming more fit and healthier.  Some of the information behind these connections has always been known… one source of health and fitness tips featured a pamphlet from the late 1800’s that for the most part held up to what we know presently about fitness and exercise.  But what has not been as explored or connected quite as much with the desire to becoming healthier and pursuing being fit, is the psychology behind the process.

The brain is an amazing piece of equipment.  From movement, to conscious, to managing the function of our organs, the brain has even convinced us of our reality and significance in the universe!  I recall watching “The Biggest Loser” and seeing the trainers (mostly Jillian Michaels) yelling and demanding of the contestants.  While I think that being able to motivate a client is an important part of being a personal trainer, being considerate and thoughtful with regard to the client, is at least as important as creating the appropriate workouts.  

Coming to this realization, I have to accept that there will be some psychology involved.  Referencing the brain, one of its function is to get the physical body through its day as easily and painlessly as possible.  Stressing the body, by definition, is painful.  I remember being told as a soldier that I need to learn how to “be comfortable with being uncomfortable”.  For all the good that comes from exercise, the ability to persevre, is essential to achieving the health benefits of a good, balanced, exercise routine.  I do think that having the willingness to bear discomfort is one of the more underrated aspects of exercising.

The last topic I would like to discuss is the difference between exercising and training.  I feel that I have touched on this before in my journal, but I do think that I should go over the difference.  When you have goals, whether it is to fit into a smaller pair of jeans, or you want to bench press your body weight, you will have to observe a trainng program design to help you reach that goal.  Training is specific, working out to achieve a goal, and it usually will include diet and cardio programs as well.  Exercising will change your body, increase your fitness level, but will not necessarily change your physical appearance.  This is not to say that by exercising regualrly that you will not achieve many, if not nearly all, of the benefits from becoming more lean and healthy.

I hope to avoid talk of what the human body is designed for and is meant to do.  But there are enough positive outcomes involved with exercise to get and keep people moving.  It is only when those outcomes fall short of satisfying an individual that they will need to begin training.  Not only does training involve more effort, it also asks that you improve upon what you did in your prior workout, adjusted for your particular goal.  Anywho, I hear some deadlifts calling me and I am ready to answer them!

1 comment:

Mary Degli Esposti said...

While I think that being able to motivate a client is an important part of being a personal trainer, being considerate and thoughtful with regard to the client, is at least as important as creating the appropriate workouts. ~Mark

And you win the trainer OBVIOUS, BUT YET award. That is most definitely meant as a compliment. People do not want to be frightened & belittled into feeling & looking better. Uhm, & mostly it NEVER works for the long-haul; and you are a long-haul kind of man.